Worthwhile August 9, 2019

What’s up?! It’s Friday and for some of us the last weekend before the new school year starts. Which means an end to the adventures of summer and the return to routine, kids at school and plenty of things to pull at our attention spans. I like routine, so the new schedule and three kids at school at the same time each day is enticing.

So what should you consume on this potentially last weekend of the summer? Here are a few options. Tailored to my preferences of course.


Killing your silly dreams.

I came of ministry age in an environment of visioneering. “God-sized” dreams that outpaced everything that has come before. Innovation for its own sake… so imagine my dismay when I read the requirements for elders in 1 Peter calling us to “shepherd the flock that is among you.” Wait, I want to shepherd the flock I design, I dream about.

Detrich Bonhoeffer in Life Together challenges us to kill our “wish dream,” and instead find gratitude for what God has given you in the midst of where you are. So kids, kill those dreams.

Chase Replogle shares his story and how Bonhoeffer wrecked him. Check it out on Christianity Today.


Sam Storms has a new book about speaking in tongues and while this can be a controversial topic, at least one that makes many people uncomfortable, there is much to learn from this scholar/pastor.

He was recently interviewed by Pneuma Today and shared that piece on his blog.

While you may not be convinced by one interview you will certainly be enlightened.

Praying in tongues enables us to bring our requests to God when we’ve run out of things to say. We are finite. Our minds eventually go dry and empty. But praying in tongues is the way in which the Spirit can articulate our prayers to the Father when we feel inadequate to do so. Also, tongues is a way in which we can sing our praises to God (1 Cor. 14:15) as well as give thanks to him (1 Cor. 14:16). 

Read the whole interview here.


Finally, I have long been a fan of Malcolm Gladwell and his inquisitive thinking. I tend to learn a lot from him in just asking the right questions of things. His podcast, Revisionist History is no exception.

Last week’s episode not only educated me on a couple of police-involved shootings, but also stirred some thinking about “disordered attachments.” Important stuff for us to think through, especially given our current political climate.

Listen to the episode here and think about subscribing. Warning: the topic is shootings so there are some hard moments of the story of one man being gunned down and why he was.


That’s it for this week. Live long and prosper, or at least take a nap. See you on the other side.

Wayback: 1 Corinthians 14

From the archives and March of 2017 comes a sermon on 1 Corinthians 14:1-25. The pursuit of the gifts of the Spirit in the gathered worship of the church.

This was an important season for our church. On the verge of executing the last phase of replanting, changing our name, we benefited from this series through 1 Corinthians. As a church that desires to highly value and pursue both Word and Spirit, the guidance Paul gives is helpful for us today.

Give it a listen here.

Some highlights:

The ramp of confirming spiritual gifts and using them in the context of love arrives here at pursuit of them and expression of them in gathered worship of the church. And Paul puts one gift ahead of the others…“Pursue love, and earnestly desire the spiritual gifts, especially that you may prophesy.”

...Since gifts are given for the common good of the church the public expression of gifts should be beneficial for the gathered church, communicated in a way that can be understood by everyone present…

The one who prophesies speaks to people for their upbuilding, encouragement and consolation. Those that believe in Jesus and are part of the church will gain from prophecy. They will be “constructed, developed, brought to maturity” by what is heard and understood. They will be encouraged in the faith, to continue in trusting Jesus and laboring in community. And they will be consoled, comforted in the wake of hardship or suffering…

When gifts are used intelligibly for the purpose of edification, encouragement, and consolation, the result is that the message of the gospel rings clear and true. People are transformed by it. It is the gospel proclaimed with regularity and spontaneity that does this good, by the Spirit…

Lead with the Tongue…

I much prefer talking about French kissing but Western Seminary professor, Gerry Brashears has posted some new thoughts about the gifts of speaking in tongues that I found worthwhile for a couple of reasons.

Truth be told, Gerry’s writing is one of the reasons I looked at Western in the first place so his wisdom has an attraction that could draw this sinner to seminary but in his essay he address the fact that his mind is changing on the issue of tongues. Here he is proving that he has not stopped learning as is mature enough to keep thinking and accept advice and challenge.

The second thing that I find worthwhile is his understanding of tongues as laid out by Paul in 1 Corinthians. He recognizes the purpose of praise in Acts and then through further epistles shows a basis for how the church should approach tongues.

Paul is quite positive about tongues, just not in the public gathering of the church. I’m not sure how I missed his statement that he would like everyone to speak in tongues (14:5). Yes, prophecy is much preferred in the gathering but that does not mean tongues have no place. He is quite clear that he speaks in tongues a lot (14:18), but not on the gathering. That’s the place for prophecy to strengthen, encourage, comfort, edify, instruct (3,4, 26, 31).

Tongues are for prayer (14:14) from the heart. Of course there is also prayer with the mind, i.e., in a known language. Both are good in their proper place, it seems. Some prefer spirit prayer while others prefer mind prayer. Neither is a higher spirituality, it seems. I think Romans 8:26 speaks to this when it says “Likewise the Spirit helps us in our weakness. For we do not know what to pray for as we ought, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groanings too deep for words.” So the groanings there are the Spirit at work helping us when our mind and understanding fail us and we don’t know how to pray. That groaning certainly could come out of my mouth, I think.

Tongues are for praise (14:16) just as they are in Acts 2:11 and 10:46. That isn’t helpful for the congregation unless it is interpreted or explained as Peter did in Acts 2.

In the gathering Paul does not speak in tongues though he does speak a lot, evidently in his private devotions. Where the Corinthians were seeing their public use of tongues as a mark of their high spirituality. Paul shows them that it is a sign, but a sign of God’s judgment on their prideful self-indulgence! Hearing Babylonian in the streets of Jerusalem in 586 BC was a sign that God’s judgment had come to sinful Judah (he quotes Isaiah 28:11 a statement of His judgment in 14:21). Similarly, it is not a blessable thing if unbelievers hear all the confusion of public tongues and walk away thinking the people and their God is crazy.

So I’m thinking tongues is private prayer and praise to God in an unknown language.

Gerry remains open for new discovery and asks for input – again willing to grow and learn before he preaches to his community of faith. I think he has a good grasp of where we should be with the use of tongues  and I know that even in Pentecostal tradition churches this is becoming the norm.