Worthwhile: May 3, 2019

It has been a bit of a whirlwind week here in Escondido but there is still plenty to share as you plan your weekend reading. A heavy subject, a better vision, and perseverance.

But first: As a member of the North County Inland Pastors Prayer group, I had the privilege of helping to draft and sign the Poway Statement on violence. It is for pastors and ministry leaders to stand together against violent acts like the one we just experienced in our community. You can view the statement at PowayPastors.org.

Anti-semitism and violence motivated by difference should have no quarter in the church and I think Jesus is bringing us as a universal church to an important moment of repentance and clarity.

Now on to the worthwhile bits for this week.


Related to the evil of white supremacy we have an article from Joe Carter on the roots of views that very well could be held in our pews.

When I was working in radio at a Christian station, of all the conversations with listeners I had the one that is most memorable is when a lady called in to complain that our station would promote a concert of DC Talk. She was appalled that we supported “mixing the races.” She even went so far to suggest that when Scripture says believers should not be “unequally yoked” it meant ethnic groups shouldn’t intermingle (and certainly never marry). I was stunned and told her she was wrong. This article brought that back to mind as I reflect on the prevalence of such a view in the church.

Take up and read to keep yourself from the same error.


Next up, we all could use a better vision given the age we live in. Why not have a “Christ-flooded vision?”

Christy Britton invites us to it in her article from early April.

A better vision awaits all who have the courage to seek the gaze of our heavenly father. When our vision is obstructed by the distracting sights before us, we need to change our field of vision. We must fix our eyes on Christ, and as we gaze on him, he will dominate our field of vision and we will be strengthened by what we see.


Our unbelief will be transformed into belief as we behold him.

Give it a read and keep your eyes up!


And lastly, mostly for pastors and youngsters, but also for all of us. The Long Haul. Darryl Dash writes about his own choice to not stick with a church and ponders the benefits of faithful, long labor in the same place.

We can be so enticed by what’s next or “greener pastures” that we fail to experience the fruit of long obedience in the same direction. Think about it as you read for yourself.


Thanks for paying attention and reading along. Have a great weekend and keep looking to Jesus!

Worthwhile: March 15, 2019

Terrible news out of New Zealand last night and this morning. Gunmen killed 49 people and wounded dozens more as they had Friday prayers in Mosques there. It is sickening and white supremacy has no place in the hearts of those claiming Christ. Two tweets in response that sum it up well. From Daniel Balcombe and Russell Moore.


Elsewhere, as Jared C. Wilson’s newest book, The Gospel-Driven Church, released this week the usual self-sanctification tropes have been trotting out. In response to one typical misuse of Scripture Jared penned a piece asking if Hebrews 6 teaches us to move beyond the gospel.

It is worth a read and some significant thought over. I am convinced that is you read Hebrews 6 wrong you miss the whole point of the book of Hebrews. So give it some time, its worthwhile.

I can’t wait to get my hands on this book by the way.


And to close the week why don’t we talk money! Dave Ramsey, the money and anti-debt guru who made it rich dolling out advice to mostly white evangelicals was taken to task, on social media anyway, for a tweet that said essentially, “if you want to be rich, do rich people stuff. If you want to be poor do poor people stuff.”

We get it, mostly.

It was a bad week to tell people to do rich people stuff. But beside that, what about the punchline or platitude approach to life? Is it helpful? As a Christian?

Matt Poppe on Christ and Pop Culture thinks it through for us and there are some helpful nuggets here.

All of us could say a version of what Ramsey said in a way most people would agree with. If your bad habits got you into financial ruin, those bad habits won’t get you out.

The problem is, even with the best of intentions, Ramsey’s sentiments about wealth disparity is an a oversimplification bordering on cruelty. When someone spends years responding to life’s complications with platitudes and proverbs, they tend to think of these teachings as absolutes over time. Particularly when someone has climbed from a state of poverty to one of financial wellness, it’s simple to tell the narrative of the struggles and personal achievement that got us to where we are. By extension, it’s easy to render judgment on those who didn’t do the same.

Money is serious stuff and we don’t like to talk about it. As I am learning as I preach through a series called Awkward. The most engaged people have been is over what I will say when I get to generosity. So this article helps us think more about it.

I have often told people I am not a fan of Ramsey because his philosophy is more Randian (objectivism – which essentially means selfish) than Christian. But this is not the time to rehash that!


That’s it for this week. Have a wonderful weekend. Tell people you love them and pray for New Zealand, pray for all of us.