Book Review

Ruthless About Hurry

While on vacation (eight days long to get the maximal refreshment) I finished the latest Christian craze that is John Mark Comer’s new book, The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry. It is a good book. There is vitally important exhortation to be counter-cultural for spiritual, psychological, and physical health. It is well researched and winsomely written. But what nags at me as I have some space from it is wondering if everything presented is actually accessible.

Now don’t get me wrong, this book still keeps its four-star rating on GoodReads, but I think so much of what is suggested is really only available to the affluent.

Comer covers this in the book, he knows the tension and realizes if you can spend $20 on a book you have some level of affluence and we should be okay with that and go on living simple. But I have been mentally wrestling with that as I don’t even think some of the practices are accessible to people in my neighborhood much less the resort town where I vacationed where locals lived a far different life.

Essentially the first half of the book, that dives into the trauma of hurry in our society and the Christian invitation to rest, is a goldmine. Well worth the time to read and contemplate. But from there I wonder if we can advocate for sabbath more broadly. I even felt like some of the tips equated to a new, hipster-approved, self-righteousness. Which is the furthest from the author’s intention.

There has to be a way to disciple all people into rest and intentional slowness before a holy God. One that includes all those we long to be in the church and our lives.

I want to wrestle with this thinking some more and maybe if you read the book we can talk it over together, slowly.

Even so, I am going to walk slower when I can and rest well to serve well. Living simple not as a result of my affluence but because I get to in Christ.

Grace

Glimpses of Rest

“Come to me, all of you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take up my yoke and learn from me, because I am lowly and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” — Matthew 11:28-30 (CSB)

This week I had a change in schedule that took the biggest item of work off the task list. The thing that each week looms as the necessity to be accomplished and product to produce. It is my routine deadline and as the week progresses, if the task is not done I increasingly wrestle with anxiety and stress toward the goal of accomplishing it.

This week, however, someone else has taken on the weight of what usually drives my schedule and because of it I can’t help but think of rest.

I have had more freedom, without the deadline and the pressure, to look into other things and catch up on items that usually don’t get much attention. And if nothing was accomplished there was no burden, no weight to lift because the major task had been taken care of.

This has been for me a small glimpse into the rest we have in Christ. Here we have his key invitation, and it still stands for everyone everywhere. Weary and burdened, in need of rest, come. The work has been done, sin has been atoned for and there are no more spiritual or cosmic deadlines to pressure you. Relief. Security. Salvation.

Oh what joy we are given, what a gift it is to rest in Jesus. To know that his way is easy. Because of his humility we can find rest for our souls. More of this, please!

What are the things that are your glimpses of rest? The embrace of a comfortable bed? The licks of a pup? The refreshing cold water when you are parched? Laughter with friends around a fire? Enjoy it. And let it remind you of the rest you have in Christ. Let it give you a taste for what is still to come in him. Rest.

Uncategorized

The Tree of Life

“He said, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten of the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?” Genesis 3:11

The moment of curse. The shame. The violation. The removal of the relationship that was good. The pity. The brokenness.

Blood was shed to cover their nakedness. They were given a promise of resolution… One day it, He, would come.

“We are all the same. We have plucked fruit from that forbidden tree. We have proudly declared that we know best, that we can take care of ourselves. We have crowned ourselves deities. “Have you eaten from the tree?” Oh, yes and yes, over and over again in ways both glaring and hidden.”

“But the God-man has been slain. The Lamb’s blood has been spilt, and it covers us. Ours rags have been replaced with his robes. The garden has been reopened; we’ve been invited back in. “Here, eat of this, it will give you life.”

“Eat from the blessed tree, dear friend. Eat and eat and never stop. When you are hungry for something else, something more, something new, run to that tree. Stay there; rest in his shade. The door is open; the meal is ready. Sit down and eat.”

Let us celebrate this Easter, and every day. It is finished. He is ours, we are his. Enjoy!

Lenten devotion from Comforts from the Cross by Elyse Fitzpatrick. Day 31.