2018 in Books

This year I had the joy of reading some wonderful books and the bulk of them were of a similar genre, theology or Christian living. I guess that is to be expected but I did mix in some good fiction and social science along the way. 

You can get a snapshot of what I read here from Goodreads but there a few books I want to highlight and encourage you to read. 

My best book of 2018 was by far Gospel Humility from Andrew McCullough. While would could all use a dose or two of plain old humility, this book focused on the mission of the church to spread the gospel across the globe. It faithfully attacks presuppositions and gives us a bigger vision for the work every Christian is commissioned to. Here is what I said in my review: 

“Phenomenal and challenging look into setting aside some culturally defined views for the advance of the gospel. This is going to become a vital book for those doing cross-cultural work which is an increasingly real thing in the West as new groups move in and become part of the fabric of our culture. 

“With a humility of his own, McCullough guides you through a missions course well worth it. Take it up, read, and let it spur you onto the good works Jesus has prepared for you.”

If you are someone who believes in Jesus and desire for others to do the same, devour this book

The next book I commend to you is Creative Minority by Heather Grizzle and John Tyson. The book paints a vision for being a redemptive influence wherever God has placed us. Using our gifts, skills, interests, and vocations to serve others and adorn the gospel of Jesus to those around us. It is a little manifesto that you can rip through in one sitting or chew over for days. I used this book in a discipleship group at Reservoir Church and it was well worthwhile. 

Finally, my fiction recommendation from 2018 is Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi. The beautifully imagined world in this tale deals with real-life struggle and gives a perspective of oppression, and the end to it, that our world could use (minus the violence!). I read this on summer vacation – it was Jimmy Fallon’s summer reading recommendation. It was a page-turner and a much-needed break from non-fiction in my collection for the year. 

Keep on reading friends and if you are looking for a place to start or head to next these three should be on your list! 

Read Faster?

This week I have been thinking through my year-end post about which book(s) were most meaningful to me. I set a goal for the number of books I wanted to read and while I came close I think I will end a bit shy of the 50 goal.

While there are a number of reasons for not meeting my goal I think the speed of reading is a big part of it. So in the next year, I want to try some techniques to increase speed while maintaining comprehension. Who wouldn’t want that?!

Here are some suggestions from Tim Ferris that I am going to implement right away. What are the techniques you use to read faster or better?

Worthwhile – November 30, 2018

Each week I read or encounter a number of things that are worthwhile and I want to get in the habit of sharing them with you. Below are things of worth from the recent weeks. 


There has been a lot of talk since Thanksgiving about the death of John Chau, a missionary killed trying to engage with an unreached people group. The conversation has raised some important questions about taking the name of Jesus to those who haven’t heard and the waning zeal of professing Christians to evangelize. Garrett Kell shares a worthwhile perspective here. Tim Challies also gives key points to keep in mind along with a poem to give us perspective, read him here.  


Advent is not all egg-nog and yuletide cheer. It can be a difficult time for many and in the church, we need to have clear eyes to see this reality and care for one another in the midst of it. Zach Eswine has a post about preaching lament at Advent that is helpful to preachers and the rest of us as well. Read that here


Finally this week, when it comes to living fully in our day it helps to understand our context and the deeper levels of thinking and culture we swim in. This Cultural Moment is a podcast from John Mark Comer and Mark Sayers full of insight and worthwhile perspective. Check it out on your podcast app or here