Worth Reading: The Gospel According to Satan

While it has been prominently placed at the number 1 spot in the “Satanist” category of Amazon, Satan is not happy about this book. Jared C. Wilson’s latest, The Gospel According to Satan: Eight Lies About God That Sound Like The Truth, is worth reading and I think will be a tremendous help to the church.

Wilson has provided another volume that brings us to Christ and opens life to real freedom. I think this book acts like a booster shot for word-centered, gospel life. Satan loves to twist truth into bondage and the finished work of Christ is what breaks us free and gives us feet to stand. Because it is written!

Each chapter is devoted to a different lie we are prone to believing. They are: God just wants you to be happy; You only live once; You need to live your truth; Your feelings are reality; Your life is what you make it; You need to let go and let God; The cross is not about wrath; and God helps those who help themselves.

Of course some of these things sound okay, maybe we even have a coffee mug with the lie printed on it! But when it comes to our flourishing and faith in Jesus, it is important that we don’t miss THE TRUTH and what we are actually called to in Christ.

Wilson is a winsome writer and this work is easily understandable and will resonate with you. The book is a great tool to help sharpen us and keep us on the path to maturity in Christ. I recommend you check it out, pick it up, download it and start reading.

Here are some choice quotes:

“Sin isn’t purely about the malfunction; it’s essentially about the faulty wiring… In that regard, grace is not simply about pardoning sinful behavior; it’s also about rewiring the sinners themselves. The grace the Bible talks about is power not just for justification but also for transformation.” (p. 7)

“Joy is the music that plays when our hearts are tuned to the frequency of God’s glory and our connection to it. Joy is the heart’s settled and worshipful contentment in our justification with God. Joy is the conviction that, no matter the sadness of our circumstances or the weakness of our bodies, we are secure in the sovereign God who loves us.” (p. 21)

“We must not think only of seizing the day but, in the day to day, taking hold of eternity.” (p. 40)

“When power becomes your god, you’ll do as much biblical gymnastics as it takes to get it or keep it.” (p. 59)

“Ignoring your feelings isn’t the answer. Facts may not care about your feelings, but Jesus does. Which is why his Word says so much about them.” (p. 73)

“Meekness is weakness weaponized against the spirit of the age and the spirit of the Antichrist…” (p. 107)

“If Satan cannot keep you from salvation, he will do his best to undermine and obscure the gospel that saved you by making you either overconfident in yourself or underconfident in God. Both dispositions make the gospel look small and consequently may prevent more people from believing.” (p. 125)

“In pursuit of a view of the atonement that is less bloody, less dark, less offensive, we may be stumbling upon one that is less effectual, less powerful, less… well, atoning.” (p. 139)

“So come needy. Come empty-handed. Turn out your pockets. Beat your chest, if you have to, and tear your clothes. Scrape the boils off your skin, if that’s what you need to do. But whatever you do, do not come to the fruit of Christ’s righteousness seeking a bargain. Do not barter, do not buy, but beg… The blessing is for those who are poor in spirit, not rich. If you will bring the empty hand of faith, however trembling, to the infinitely holy Lord of the universe, he will fill it with the immeasurable riches of himself. There is no other way. God is actively looking to save those who cannot save themselves.” (p. 170)

Word & Spirit by R.T. Kendall

Word and Spirit: Truth, Power, and the Next Great Move of God by R.T. Kendall

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Kendall, the former pastor of Westminster Chapel, brings to the page the necessity of a marriage of both Word (Bible-believing and centered) and Spirit (believing in the continued gifting of the Holy Spirit.) It is setting the environment for an awakening in the global church according to Kendall and would be something greater than the “Charismatic” movement of the last thirty years.

I agreed with much of what is in this little book, however unfortunate it is to have the forward by Mark Driscoll. Yet with Kendall’s presentation, I am still left hungry for something more. While I long for the day he describes, perhaps a clearer picture of what healthy Word & Spirit churches look like would be helpful.

Kendall is clear in his writing but an annoying feature of this book is that barely a page goes by without the author referencing another book he has written. The refrain, “as I wrote in such and such a book” is so prevalent it is annoying. I get that he has written many books, some on my list to read, but there must be a better way to cite his previous thinking if at all.



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Worthwhile December 27, 2019

The end of the year is here. I didn’t quite reach my reading goal. My weight isn’t what I would prefer. I haven’t scaled unconquerable mountains. But we persist. Trusting in Jesus. His purpose prevails.

A couple of reminders of that truth for your weekend reading.


First up the real abundant life. Rankin Wilbourne wrote for TGC on suffering as an experience of abundant life. It is quite the opposite of what you might here from many religious leaders, but I think he is right.

“Jesus, the perfect image of God and the perfect human being, shows us that a fully human life must include suffering, and that we can only become the man or woman God intends us to be through suffering. Jesus, who was without sin and never did anything to deserve his Father’s displeasure, was made “perfect through suffering” (Heb. 2:10). The author of Hebrews dares to say that Jesus “learned obedience through what he suffered” (Heb. 5:8), and that this is part of what makes him our compassionate high priest (Heb. 4:15), able to help us in our time of need. If Jesus, the perfect child, had to learn how to trust and obey through suffering, how much more necessary is it for you and me?”

It takes a long time to be familiar with suffering, and maybe longer to see it as part of the maturing process in Christ. May we be quick to see it in the new year.

Read the whole thing here.


And maybe a few days late but nevertheless important, let’s not neglect the genealogies.

Jennie Pollock exhorts us to read and hear and be encouraged.

“Why on earth would God want to start the New Testament, the story of the new covenant, the bit that most people nowadays are likely to start with, if they’re going to read a Bible at all, with a genealogy? Who wants to read a long stream of unpronounceable names of total strangers before the story starts? Is it like the title cards at the beginning of old movies? Important information to those concerned, but just an opportunity to make yourself comfortable and arrange your snacks for the rest of us? …When those scriptures were read out, for hundreds of years, the descendants of those individuals would have been listening eagerly for their family names, feeling an intimate connection to the story.”

Oh friend you are tied to the story!

“For Christians then, the New Testament starts not with echoes of Genesis, not with the breaking of a 400 year silence, not with the fulfillment of prophecies, but with us. It sets us right in the narrative, reminding us of who we are and where we fit, rooting us in the story, and the story in us.”

Read the whole thing.


Thank you for checking in one last time in 2019. In the new year I am planning some more sharing of great ideas and efforts to be a redemptive expression in our world. If you come across any, send them my way!

May you be blessed as we turn the calendar and may you see more of Jesus in 2020!

The Perfect Gift For Those Still On The List

Okay, perfect might be a stretch, but if you are wanting to close out your Christmas shopping and are looking for that last gift, might I recommend Depths, a daily devotional rich with gospel goodness. I am biased of course as the author. But this really is the gift that keeps giving, 366 days of Scripture and reflection that mine the depths of the fullness of Christ.

You can grab your copy on Amazon, and download one for yourself on the Kindle.

To give you a flavor of the devotional, here is today’s entry:

December 3

Studying the works of the Lord

Great are the works of the LORD, studied by all who delight in them. Full of splendor and majesty is his work, and his righteousness endures forever.” -Psalm 111:2–3

There is so much noise in our lives. The schedules, the responsibilities, the people we love, the people we are required to interact with… It can all add up to some hefty distraction and lead us to miss some important things, specifically the great works God has done and is doing in our lives for his glory and our good.

But his works are there, undergirding all things by his creative genius and authority. And oh, the work of the cross—what a miracle and wonder that God himself would be our substitute, meting wrath for sin and defeating death once-for-all! Then come Jesus’ resurrection and the new life it promises us in salvation. We even have the little things, the subtle kindnesses—the grace of rain on parched land or the sustaining wind of the Holy Spirit in the lives of believers.

It is these works, the unending works of splendor, majesty, and righteousness that we are now free to delight in, to enjoy as we live. In our delight, in our thanksgiving for them, we can study them, pursue them, read, hear, and tell of them. Let us be reminded once again of Christ’s great work for us and that we might proclaim it so others can experience it too.

Today, pick a few of the great works of the Lord in your life—be it salvation or the provision of a new day. Think about them, savor them, and rejoice in the giver of those gifts. Rest in his wondrous works.

Review and buy a copy of Depths here and Merry Christmas!