Little Adventures Make for a Big Life

Being a parent is a wonderful thing. The responsibility of lovingly forming little humans, giving them experiences and seeing them dream and flourish is all a gift.

But parenting can also come preloaded with a weight of expectation. How do I compare to others, how will my children ultimately be prepared to compete with others and will they meet the cultural standards of success.

Challenging those cultural standards is for another post, but what of helping our kids or even ourselves dream and flourish.

I think a helpful tool toward a big or full life is little adventures.

We live in a time where experience is becoming an idol. We follow Instagram profiles that make money making experience look amazing. Maybe it’s travel, food, or you name it. Everything has to be just right for the photo so we assume it is amazing. And we end up trying to replicate it. Even beyond experience idolatry, we can be consumed with “going big or going home.” We think we have to make every moment over the top to excel at parenting. Every party has a theme and must outdo last year’s.

Where those things may be worthwhile occasionally, they can’t be the mainstay for parenting in the real world.

Our attempt at a solution for that? Little adventures.

Doing things that are not extravagant but new or with added twists to engage our kids.

A recent little adventure for our family was a train ride to the coast for a day of fun and being together. The kids devised a checklist of things to find looking from the train, we studied the transit schedule, we walked along a pier, had a picnic on the beach and played with new friends we met who were adopted from Eritrea. The whole day was as expensive as $2 train tickets and a round of milkshakes.

A little adventure that left our kids dreaming and scheming. All of us are a bit more “full” on our way to a big life.

What are some of the little adventures you can take? Maybe go to the top of that hill or visit that historic house. Engage and have some fun.

You might be surprised by what awaits you.

Consuming the Bread of Life

Today I preached from John 6, specifically verses 22-58. It is a wonderful text and one that is truly vital for, I think every believer in Jesus, and certainly me. It has been an encouragement in my walk and pursuit of Christ.

The text has a confounding bit mixed in with some amazing theological encouragements. The declaration that the Father gives those that believe in Jesus to the Son and those that come to him will never be cast out. What grace, what joy to be included in this number.

The confounding piece though is that Jesus tells the crowd that is seeking after him that they need to eat him, consume his flesh, drink his blood.

Now the crowd did have some mixed motives for tracking Jesus down and attempting to force him to give them miraculous food. Just the day before he fed more than 5,000 and they sought more free lunches. But they were after temporary things and Jesus was set to provide something permanent and satisfying. Himself.

So he says that he is the Bread of Life. He is the sustenance, the provision, the life-giving portion for those that believe.

For those that reject Christ, this is a good place to throw a punch. The Savior claims you have to dine on him.

Of course when we have a fuller view of what took place during Holy Week, the death on the cross as foretold and the resurrection, we gain an understanding of what Jesus meant. That he must be seen, trusted, and pursued as the only thing, One that satisfies. That meets the internal desire for more. And that trust is in his body broken for us and blood shed to cover our sin and disregard of our creator.

This is then what we consume. A steady and daily diet of reminder of what Jesus accomplished for us. That we have been forgiven and called to life in him. That what aches in us is only satisfied in him.

As we head into Holy Week (the days leading up to the celebration of Resurrection Sunday) perhaps John 6 is a good place to linger. To meditate on Christ’s words and his promise. That we would consume the Bread of Life.

Worthwhile: April 12, 2019

You guys, it’s April 12. Easter is next week. Spring Break. Oh my times flies.

This week one very important piece to share and a new resource that will keep on giving. Both things that are worthwhile as you embark on the weekend and the beginning of Holy Week.


First up, the piece that needs you attention, Kyle Korver on privilege. He speaks with honesty about disparity and our need to listen and pay attention.

As a white male it can be a task to recognize my privilege. We don’t see the opposite so we don’t notice our benefit against the backdrop of systemic racism in our culture.

Take up and read. Keep your eyes open.


For those keen for more solid Word and Spirit material, Advance, a church strengthening and planting movement, has just launched a podcast as a resource pile of some great teaching. Check it out.

Good news for everyone who is part of the Podcast world! Advance’s substantial conference recording library is now available as a podcast on all major apps!

The library includes every conference recording since the very first Global gathering in 2015. Now in your pocket!

iTunes https://apple.co/2Z5g7zY
Google http://bit.ly/2Gi1Ad9
Spotify https://spoti.fi/2UuztQy

Generosity Exemplified

Today I wrap up a preaching series on the awkward things of Christianity and being part of the church. This sermon was on generosity.

Of course through our study these last weeks we have seen a number of examples of generosity formed by the grace of Christ. Oh may the Lord make us generous! Here are some of them that didn’t make it into what was preached.


In this series, we have met some characters that live it out. Zaccheaus gives over most of his wealth because of his encounter with Jesus. His whole purpose of life changes… to restore what was broken through generosity. “Zacchaeus’ giving is not an entrance requirement or necessary model of our own application of the gospel. But it is a model of the proper and natural response to God’s saving grace toward us. Grace frees us to give freely and boldly as we trust in God to meet all our needs (Matt. 6:25-34).” – Gospel Transformation Bible

Or the call girl that weeps at Jesus’ feet, how she spends all of herself for her glory. Her money, the jar of ointment, and he identity, everything extravagantly at his feet.

We see other stories… of the woman giving pennies out of her desperation more honored than the rich… Luke 21:3–4 “And he said, “Truly, I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all of them. [4] For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on.” (ESV)

We hear what the kingdom is like – Matthew 13:44 “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.” (ESV)

In his joy – cheerfully giving everything else up for what was truly of value. This is counter-cultural, this can make us uncomfortable… but it is so good.